Category Archives: Education

unfortunately…forced into leaving teaching

In an earlier post, I compared “social media” constraints at the end of my teaching career with “social” (public drinking) constraints at its start. In that post, I wondered if the anti-public drinking constraint was aimed particularly at women. …Would … Continue reading

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Part 1: Family Library–How It Happened

Being asked to edit a colleague’s assignment turned out to be a spectacular personal and professional bonus! From the moment I first read in my colleague’s library visitation report that the media specialist whose library she formally observed had invited … Continue reading

Posted in Books, Children, Education, Families, Family, Kidlit, LIbrarians, Library, Library Media Specialist, Parents, Reading, School | 2 Comments

Part 2: Family Library–Gratifying Work in Progress

In general, here’s how our Family Library worked. Usually after school (rather than before), when there was more browsing time, parents or grandparents would come to the library with (though sometimes without) their children. I would create a family account … Continue reading

Posted in Books, Children, Education, Families, Family, Kidlit, LIbrarians, Library, Library Media Specialist, Parents, Reading, School, Students, Teachers, Teaching | 2 Comments

Part 3: Family Library–Payoff

There are many things I am proud to have done professionally; there are many things I will miss about being an educator. High on the list of those things is the Family Library experience I was privileged to facilitate, which … Continue reading

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something old; something new…not involving weddings

Of all the additional expenses I imagined I might have in retirement, here’s one I underestimated. Fortunately, on the one hand, it’s a relatively low cost item. And totally discretionary. On the other hand, the cumulative cost of how many … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Employment, Retirement, School, Students, Teaching, Transitions, Work, Writing | 2 Comments

time out

When I started teaching, I felt sad that forty-eight minute classes were totally insufficient for students to experience my ambitious plans for exciting learning. With so much “great stuff” I wanted to facilitate on a daily basis, P.A. announcements, fire … Continue reading

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timing

July has given way to August. And I realized something about the passage of time during these countdown days. In the past, when I was counting down to the start of the school year, I did so at this half-way … Continue reading

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not what, but who; joyfully (un)realistic!

The same undergraduate methods professor who introduced me to the Henry Adams quote, discussed in prior posts, that guided my teaching, gave the following words of wisdom, which he repeated often throughout our coursework, making them his mantra. I’m paraphrasing: … Continue reading

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halfway out, and still fighting the bad rap

Halfway through the sixty days’ resignation to retirement, I’m thinking about the posts I’ve written as a map of where my mind has been. Surprised that I’m still reflecting so much on teaching–still infuriated over new teacher evaluation systems and … Continue reading

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high stakes testing: stone walled vs. living stones

High-stakes testing really makes my blood boil. (If you’ve kindly read the past few posts: Can you tell?) More than that. It makes my stomach turn. A good student (summa cum laude graduate), I was a lousy test taker—a tried-and-true … Continue reading

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